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Digital Dreams of Russia

A remarkable occurrence is underway in Hong Kong, in which Rusal, the first Russian company to list on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and the world-leading aluminium producer, commemorates its 15th anniversary with Digital Dreams of Russia, Hong Kong’s first-ever multimedia exhibition of Russian visual art. It is also the first ever digital “enlivening” of masterpieces from the State Tretyakov Gallery.

The State Tretyakov Gallery is one of the world’s major art museums and a veritable treasure trove of Russian art. The museum holds a collection of more than 170,000 pieces, including works of global significance. Fifteen of its most revered 19th and 20th-century masterpieces have been thoughtfully selected for this exhibition at Hong Kong's PMQ, representing various aspects of Russian life throughout the ages. The work is showcased through cutting-edge multimedia audio-visual animation and sound, specifically created for this exhibition. The show tells the story of Russia and its diverse nature and people, its long and rich history and traditions, economic development, and fascinating mythology.

Said Ms Vers Kurochkina, Rusal's deupty CEO, "We hope visitors will be inspired by the cutting-edge multimedia and also have a chance to understand the 'mystery of the Russian soul.'"

The artworks will be a revelation to most. From Boris Kustodiev's uplifting festive snowscape Pancake Week (1916), with sleigh rides and racing troikas, which wouldn't look out of place on any lacquered box, to Aristarkh Lentulov's Vasily the Beatified (1913), a fantastic architectural myth that invokes French Cubism and traditions of folk art to render the famous St Basil's Cathedral in Red Square, Moscow, with blue cupolas, golden stars and colored strips of sky. Lentulov was a founder of the Russian Avant-Garde. 

Kazimir Malevich, founder of Suprematism, and one of Russia's leading though largely unknown startists, is represented by Haymaking (1928-1929), which shows a monumental, immovable peasant (see above) and a return to the artist's figurative work. This painting was presented in 1929 for a solo Malevich exhibition at the Tretyakov Gallery. As the 1917 revolution came and went and times changed, so did the artwork, and Yuri Pimenov's Heavy Industry (1927) depicts the new man and woman, workers, transforming the world around them, in a rich photomontage of a painting. The everyday becomes epic, and the humble workers heroes. It's propagandist, dramatic and theatrical and strangely premonitious of the work of contemporary French photographer Jean-Paul Goude.

And then there's the technology, used to enhance and enable the experience of the viewer by revealing the 'life' of each painting's respective depth and feeling. Rather than gimmicking, gadgetising and game-playing the art, it delivers an unexpected 'point of entry'. The works become virtual reality canvases we step into and want to stay in. 

Much like the entire exhibition. This is grand work from an even greater country. 

Until July 5, 2015: The Qube, PMQ - 35 Aberdeen Street, Central (From 11am; Free admission)

IMAGE: Haymaking, 1928-1929, Kazimir Malevich (1879-1935). Courtesy of the State Tretyakov Gallery

Admin

Digital Dreams of Russia

A remarkable occurrence is underway in Hong Kong, in which Rusal, the first Russian company to list on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and the world-leading aluminium producer, commemorates its 15th anniversary with Digital Dreams of Russia, Hong Kong’s first-ever multimedia exhibition of Russian visual art. It is also the first ever digital “enlivening” of masterpieces from the State Tretyakov Gallery.

The State Tretyakov Gallery is one of the world’s major art museums and a veritable treasure trove of Russian art. The museum holds a collection of more than 170,000 pieces, including works of global significance. Fifteen of its most revered 19th and 20th-century masterpieces have been thoughtfully selected for this exhibition at Hong Kong's PMQ, representing various aspects of Russian life throughout the ages. The work is showcased through cutting-edge multimedia audio-visual animation and sound, specifically created for this exhibition. The show tells the story of Russia and its diverse nature and people, its long and rich history and traditions, economic development, and fascinating mythology.

Said Ms Vers Kurochkina, Rusal's deupty CEO, "We hope visitors will be inspired by the cutting-edge multimedia and also have a chance to understand the 'mystery of the Russian soul.'"

The artworks will be a revelation to most. From Boris Kustodiev's uplifting festive snowscape Pancake Week (1916), with sleigh rides and racing troikas, which wouldn't look out of place on any lacquered box, to Aristarkh Lentulov's Vasily the Beatified (1913), a fantastic architectural myth that invokes French Cubism and traditions of folk art to render the famous St Basil's Cathedral in Red Square, Moscow, with blue cupolas, golden stars and colored strips of sky. Lentulov was a founder of the Russian Avant-Garde. 

Kazimir Malevich, founder of Suprematism, and one of Russia's leading though largely unknown startists, is represented by Haymaking (1928-1929), which shows a monumental, immovable peasant (see above) and a return to the artist's figurative work. This painting was presented in 1929 for a solo Malevich exhibition at the Tretyakov Gallery. As the 1917 revolution came and went and times changed, so did the artwork, and Yuri Pimenov's Heavy Industry (1927) depicts the new man and woman, workers, transforming the world around them, in a rich photomontage of a painting. The everyday becomes epic, and the humble workers heroes. It's propagandist, dramatic and theatrical and strangely premonitious of the work of contemporary French photographer Jean-Paul Goude.

And then there's the technology, used to enhance and enable the experience of the viewer by revealing the 'life' of each painting's respective depth and feeling. Rather than gimmicking, gadgetising and game-playing the art, it delivers an unexpected 'point of entry'. The works become virtual reality canvases we step into and want to stay in. 

Much like the entire exhibition. This is grand work from an even greater country. 

Until July 5, 2015: The Qube, PMQ - 35 Aberdeen Street, Central (From 11am; Free admission)

IMAGE: Haymaking, 1928-1929, Kazimir Malevich (1879-1935). Courtesy of the State Tretyakov Gallery

Admin